Hurricane Harvey nearly ended it all for us. But thanks to some lessons learned a few years ago and some serious preparations, Flying Cloud became one of three survivors in Cove Harbor, Rockport, Texas while over 700 other boats were destroyed. Most of which were not even in the water.
Harvey took a direct hit on our small cove. The satellite image shows Harvey directly over Cove Harbor where everything within many miles was totally destroyed.
In spite of all our preparation, we were blessed to have her saved when so many were lost.
 Click on Images for Larger View

 

      

 Cove Harbor got the strongest part of the winds and with the eye passing directly over just before midnight. Here the eye is just north of our position those winds had a Northwesterly component. That put 130mph winds directly  on Flying Clouds stern and then eventually on her starboard quarter.

 


 Flying Cloud is in the upper right corner, stern-to the dock. This is a screen shot from the video taken by a drone flying over the area. Our first confirmation that Flying Cloud had survived.

 

 This photo taken across the cove from our marina shows Flying Cloud and three other boats. These were the only survivors in the entire cove. The blue boat on the right sank the day after this photo was taken.
The large boat turned sideways when her lines broke. Her bow speared the mast on the smaller boat, sending it crashing down on Flying Cloud.

 

 

Flying Cloud has these two Stainless "drogue plates" installed thru the transom. I did this for a chafe proof place to attach a Jordon Series Drogue but used them to secure her to a separate set of pilings behind the bulkhead I tied her to for the storm. I used three strand nylon. Here the pic shows braid which I had just swapped out before this picture was taken. Three strand out performed the braid.
Behind Flying Cloud is a large deck/dock. Cloud pulled on these lines so hard that it tore the dock away from the concrete bulkhead by a distance of 20 inches. Photo below..

 


 

 

 

 
Flying Cloud did pretty well thru the storm. However, my neighbors mast came down right across the aft cabin and mizzen boom. This damaged the stern pulpit, cabin top and two hatches, upper mizzen shroud, two lower mizzen shrouds, the main back stay (insulated for SSB Antenna)and did some damage to the Monitor windvane.
 


 

We later discovered that those white scrapes in the topsides of the blue boat next door, came from Flying Clouds Port Spreader. The boats were heeled over so far that the spreader hit his boat leaving blue paint on my destroyed port spreader.
 
 
With the marina pretty much destroyed, no water or electric and the constant danger of the boat storage building across the street falling down on me, I decided that I needed to relocate Flying Cloud. It had only been a few days since Harvey had passed thru leaving a path of destruction, I knew there wouldn't be many slips available, if any at all.
Teri was still in the FEMA hotel room in LaGrange, Texas so I took one day and drove East to every marina I could locate. No luck. No slips available anywhere. Especially a live-aboard slip.
I returned to Rockport, dove thru the County Marina and found a spot that I thought might work for us. I really didn't want to be in Rockport but beggars can't be choosy, so I went to the Navigation District office and talked to an old contact who obligingly offered the slip to me. I then contacted Boat US Towing and arranged to have Flying Cloud towed to the new location.
We had spent nearly a year in this marina before and I wasn't happy about having to return here. But it was the only space available and I also knew that it wouldn't be very long until other folks in the same situation as myself, would be wanting slips for their boats. So, like it or not, this would have to do.

Flying Cloud arrived and I set about trying to make her livable again. Mold, wet and ruined clothing, rats and cockroaches had taken over. What a disgusting mess.
I started attacking the mold, then set traps for the rats. Put out the best roach bait I could get my hands on and slept in the truck a couple nights rather than sleep onboard in that crap.
Gradually, working two to four days straight and going back to Teri for a few days, I finally got rid of the last rat. Seven total in two weeks and boy did they do some damage in the temporary and final residence.
 
 
  The time spent with Teri I rested and planned for my next visit. We did some site-seeing and visited historical sites. Teri was doing pretty good now, but still a bit shaky and weak.
Her infection was gone but she had very little strength and was a constant risk for falling.
After a few days it was time to return to Rockport and move forward with getting our home back in shape.
So I returned again, and again, and yet again. More frustrated with every return we tried to find a hotel closer to Rockport. A hundred twenty miles was just to far to commute every few days. Plus I wasn't making the headway I had set out for myself. Frustrated we rented a room in the closest Motel 6. What a huge mistake that was.
 
    Our room was beyond descriptio. The bed was a piece of plywood covered with. The bed was a piece of plywood covered with Formicaand a thin foam pad laid on top. The shower didn't work right, every sound echoed thru the room and the TV sounded like a mini voice inside a box somewhere. What a joke. But the price wasn't a joke! We made it thru one night and that was it.and a thin foam pad laid on top. The shower didn't work right, every sound echoed thru the room and the TV sounded like a mini voice inside a box somewhere. What a joke. But the price wasn't a joke! We made it thru one night and that was it. Thhenext day we searched for another room and found nothing. Sonext day we searched for another room and found nothing. So Teriisaid, "let's just go home". Enough said. We drove the thirty miles to Rockport and Flying Cloud.said, "let's just go home". Enough said. We drove the thirty miles to Rockport and Flying Cloud.
Services were lacking all over the area. We finally had electric and then water. Building and cleaning supplies couldn't be found anywhere. A drive of sixty miles was not uncommon to purchase anything.
 
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